Image use must be for education or personal purposes only.
The contributing institution must be credited.
LaHave Islands Marine Museum

Propeller, Watercraft


Accession number: 1978.133.01
Date: before 1978
Materials: metal; steel.
Measurements: 45 cm L x 13 cm W x 7 cm H
Narrative: Propellers
            Propellers for watercraft come in many shapes, designs, and sizes depending on the size and function of the boat/engine. The three basic characteristics of propellers that affect it’s performance are diameter, rotations per minute (RPM), and pitch. The single most important of these three characteristics is the diameter, or size of the propeller.Typically, the bigger the blades are, the more efficient the propulsion since there is more surface area pushing against the water. This is mostly true for vessels that generally do not travelling over 35 knots because a larger propeller can actually create drag at high speeds. To this effect, additional blades or multiple propellers can be added to increase performance efficiency at high speeds.
            Dual blade propellers are typically used by sailboats or high speed power boats since they balance well. More recently, the switch to three or four blade propellers has been more common since they are also well balanced and give more surface area with a smaller diameter.
Lunenburg by the Sea
            Lunenburg and it’s surrounding county have existed since the 1700’s. Being a coastal community in Nova Scotia with many harbours, Lunenburg became a fishing and ship building economy as early as the late 1700s. As shipping began to boom as an industry through the nineteenth century, Lunenburg quickly became a ship building hub along the coast. The demand for freight and fishing boats was high and Lunenburg also contributed to the demand since it also contained lucrative fishing and agriculture industries. Ship building was one of it’s largest industries however, and by 1919 Lunenburg boasted three ship yards and five other ship building establishments that had the capacity to build or service 15 to 18 vessels at any given time.
            One of these establishments was founded in 1891 as the Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering Limited, also known as the Lunenburg Industrial Foundry and Engineering (trademarked as LIFE). LIFE has contributed to the constructing and servicing of many vessels throughout it’s existence, including service to naval vessels in both World Wars, and contributing most famously to the construction of the Bluenose (1921) and Bluenose II (1963). It not only produced the vessels but was also responsible for building engines and other related parts. Lunenburg Shipyard (est. 1897), later renamed Lunenburg Marine Railway (LMR) was also one of the primary shipyards responsible for the service and construction of many vessels since it’s creation, and is still operational today under the control of LIFE.
Description: A metal 6 horsepower Lunenburg watercraft propeller. The ends of each arm of the propellor are rounded. The arms themselves are twisted (purposely) for effective propulsion. 
History of Use: Propellers
            Propellers for watercraft come in many shapes, designs, and sizes depending on the size and function of the boat/engine. The three basic characteristics of propellers that affect their performance are diameter, rotations per minute (RPM), and pitch. The single most important of these three characteristics is the diameter, or size of the propeller.Typically, the bigger the blades are, the more efficient the propulsion since there is more surface area pushing against the water. This is mostly true for vessels that generally do not travelling over 35 knots because a larger propeller can actually create drag at high speeds. To counter this effect, additional blades or multiple propellers can be added to increase performance efficiency at high speeds.
            Dual blade propellers are typically used by sailboats or high speed power boats since they balance well. More recently, the switch to three or four blade propellers has been more common since they are also well balanced and give more surface area with a smaller diameter.
Lunenburg by the Sea
            As shipping began to boom as an industry through the nineteenth century, Lunenburg quickly became a ship building hub along the coast. The demand for freight and fishing boats was high and Lunenburg also contributed to the demand since it also contained lucrative fishing and agriculture industries. Ship building was one of it’s largest industries however, and by 1919 Lunenburg boasted three ship yards and five other ship building establishments that had the capacity to build or service 15 to 18 vessels at any given time.
            Founded in 1891 as the Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering Limited, also known as the Lunenburg Industrial Foundry and Engineering (trademarked as LIFE). LIFE has contributed to the constructing and servicing of many vessels throughout it’s existence, including service to naval vessels in both World Wars, and contributing most famously to the construction of the Bluenose (1921) and Bluenose II (1963). It not only produced the vessels but was also responsible for building engines and other related parts. Lunenburg Shipyard (est. 1897), later renamed Lunenburg Marine Railway (LMR) was also one of the primary shipyards responsible for the service and construction of many vessels since it’s creation, and is still operational today under the control of LIFE.