Shell, Artillery
Shell, Artillery
Shell, Artillery
Shell, Artillery
Shell, Artillery
Shell, Artillery
Shell, Artillery
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MacPhee House Community Museum

Shell, Artillery


Accession number: 1996.004.001
Category: Ammunition
Date: November 11 1918
Materials: metal, steel; metal, brass; metal, copper
Measurements: 25 cm H x 8.25 cm DiameterShell is 19.0 cm from base to start of ogive to nose plug. Copper driving band 1.0 cm deep at 3.0 cm from base. Nose plug is flat with 1.0cm square, 1.0cm deep hole in centre. Plug has 0.125 cm threaded hole through to interior of plug.
Marks/Label:

Inscribed on casing at 10.0 cm from base and descending: QF 18 PR IT FS Scotia (in script) 11 11 15 MP

Narrative: This artillery shell was manufactured in Trenton, Nova Scotia by the TrentonWorks, known then as the Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Company, which was a conglomeration of factories in the Maritimes. The factory in Trenton primarily produced railcars and other steelworks, except for during the First World War when it was repurposed to produce munitions. The artillery shell was removed from production capped but unfilled.
The shell was subsequently acquired by the donor's family, and used in their Sheet Harbour, Nova Scotia home as a fire-place ornament.
Description:  The object is an 18 Pound Quick Fire artillery shell. The object is comprised of cylindrical shaped steel. The object tapers slightly inwards to the brass top, and the removable nose plug. 
History of Use:

The 18 pound quick-fire artillery shell was used in the 18-pounder field gun, which was the most common gun used by British, Canadian, and other Commonwealth countries in the First World War. After the Boer War, the British realized that they needed a quick firing gun with greater mobility, firepower, and loading speed. Thus the 18-pounder gun was introduced for British and Commonwealth artilleries. By 1914, 1225 guns had been produced. When first developed, the artillery shells in the 18-pounder gun were most commonly shrapnel shells used to target men in the open, and filled with lead antimony balls that would scatter when the shell exploded. Later in the war, due to the shift to trench warfare, gas, smoke, high explosive, amour piercing, and incendiary shells were also developed for the 18-pounder gun. Each type of shell would also have a variety of “marks” with different specifications. For most of the varieties of shells, the fuse was located in the nose cap, inside the percussion pellet with the detonator would ignite the powder. The percussion pellet sat near the point of the fuse, and an aluminum cap protected it from the fuse.