Camera
Camera
Camera
Camera
Camera
Image use must be for education or personal purposes only.
The contributing institution must be credited.
Fultz House Museum

Camera


Accession number: 1981.20.03d
Date: 1930
Materials: Leather; cardboard; metal
Measurements: 14.5 cm L x 8 cm W x 11 cm H
Model: Kodak Hawkeye No. 2 Model C
Narrative: By 1878, documenting life through photographs was becoming increasingly more popular. However, the wet plated process of developing photographs was inconvenient. They had to be coated, exposed and developed immediately after taking the shot, while the plate was still wet. After taking a holiday with such a camera in 1878, George Eastman set about developing a process that would make photography a cheap and portable hobby that could be enjoyed by all.
In 1878, Eastman manufactured a dry plate covered in gelatin that preserved the negatives longer, meaning they did not have to be developed immediately after the image was captured. By 1880, Eastman began mass-producing his dry plates on the United States consumer market. In 1881, Eastman and Henry Strong developed a working partnership and formed the Eastman Dry Plate Company. In 1888, Eastman developed a hand held camera, the first of its kind.
From this point on, Eastman’s company began a shift from producing parts for cameras to developing the camera’s themselves. During this time, Eastman came up with the name Kodak which evolved from his love of the letter ‘K’ and a mismatch of other letters in the English alphabet. As a result of this shift, the company changed its name to the Eastman Company in 1892. By this time, the association with the term Kodak to the company was so inseparable that the name quickly changed again to the Eastman Kodak Company. George Eastman’s goal for his company was to put a simple, usable and affordable camera into the hands of the consumer. He was quoted as saying “You press the button, we do the rest,” which quickly became the company’s slogan.
The first Kodak models sold for $25.00, about 2 weeks wages. While this was relatively cheap for camera’s at the time, it was still an expensive purchase. What truly separated Kodak from other photography companies was the manufacture of the Pocket Kodak in 1895. It was sold on the market for $5.00, a very affordable price. The Eastman Kodak Company revolutionized the world of photography again in 1900 with its new Brownie Model Series. It was sold for $1.00, making it the most affordable camera on the market.
 As the Eastman Kodak Company and its camera’s became popular on the consumer market, “Kodaking” became a common term to describe photography using a Kodak camera. The household was where George Eastman wanted to focus his marketing. He believed that women and children were the key to immersing his hand-held cameras into everyday life. Women were usually the ones who recorded the everyday life of the family, and their children were the main subjects. Eastman also believed in the education of children and that “the progress of the world depends entirely on education.” He was a very charitable man and donated money to institutions such as Massachusetts Institue of Technology where he had hired many graduates to work on evolving his camera technology.
How did George Eastman celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Eastman Kodak Company in 1930? By giving away 552, 000 Kodak camera’s to children in the United States and Canada who were born in 1918 and would be turning twelve that year. The giveaway began on May 1, 1930 and would last until May 31, 1930 or when the supply of 552, 000 cameras had been given away. This celebration only lasted for three days. The Eastman Kodak Company explained that the reason they were celebrating their anniversary in this way was because they wanted to thank their loyal customers who desired to try their hand at amateur photography by using Kodak cameras for the past 50 years. Eastman had always advertised his cameras as educational tools for children and that photography was a skill best learned by exploring. However, it is also clear that the reason for this massive giveaway was to strengthen the company’s relationship with consumers and attract more business.
The 50th anniversary cameras were the Kodak Hawkeye No. 2 Model C, a sister to the Brownie Model B produced in 1907. According to Camera Historian Ivan Lo, these cameras were simple and inexpensive to mass produce. They had a single portrait orientation, fixed aperture, and a fixed focus lens. Therefore, the operator only had control over the shutter speed. While the Model C had been on the market since 1926, the company produced them in a multitude of colours (red, blue, green, beige etc.)  especially for the anniversary.
Description: Kodak camera, anniversary edition (1880-1930). Brown leather covering, box-shaped, handle on top, viewing hole on side. The camera has two metal latches at the top which, when opened, allow the camera to be pulled apart to unload and reload the 120 film. 
History of Use: How did George Eastman celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Eastman Kodak Company in 1930? By giving away 552, 000 Kodak cameras to children in the United States and Canada who were born in 1918 and would be turning twelve that year. The giveaway began on May 1, 1930 and would last until May 31, 1930 or when the supply of 552, 000 cameras had been given away. This celebration only lasted for three days. The Eastman Kodak Company explained that the reason they were celebrating their anniversary in this way was because they wanted to thank their loyal customers who desired to try their hand at amateur photography by using Kodak cameras for the past 50 years. Eastman had always advertised his cameras as educational tools for children and that photography was a skill best learned by exploring. However, it is also clear that the reason for this massive giveaway was to strengthen the company’s relationship with consumers and attract more business.
The 50th anniversary cameras were the Kodak Hawkeye No. 2 Model C, a sister to the Brownie Model B produced in 1907. According to Camera Historian Ivan Lo, these cameras were simple and inexpensive to mass produce. They had a single portrait orientation, fixed aperture, and a fixed focus lens. Therefore, the operator only had control over the shutter speed. While the Model C had been on the market since 1926, the company produced them in a multitude of colours (red, blue, green, beige etc.)  especially for the anniversary.
By 1878, documenting life through photographs was becoming increasingly more popular. However, the wet plated process of developing photographs was inconvenient. They had to be coated, exposed and developed immediately after taking the shot, while the plate was still wet. After taking a holiday with such a camera in 1878, George Eastman set about developing a process that would make photography a cheap and portable hobby that could be enjoyed by all.
In 1878, Eastman manufactured a dry plate covered in gelatin that preserved the negatives longer, meaning they did not have to be developed immediately after the image was captured. By 1880, Eastman began mass-producing his dry plates on the United States consumer market. In 1881, Eastman and Henry Strong developed a working partnership and formed the Eastman Dry Plate Company. In 1888, Eastman developed a hand held camera, the first of its kind.
From this point on, Eastman’s company began a shift from producing parts for cameras to developing the camera’s themselves. During this time, Eastman came up with the name Kodak which evolved from his love of the letter ‘K’ and a mismatch of other letters in the English alphabet. As a result of this shift, the company changed its name to the Eastman Company in 1892. By this time, the association with the term Kodak to the company was so inseparable that the name quickly changed again to the Eastman Kodak Company. George Eastman’s goal for his company was to put a simple, usable and affordable camera into the hands of the consumer. He was quoted as saying “You press the button, we do the rest,” which quickly became the company’s slogan.
The first Kodak models sold for $25.00, about 2 weeks wages. While this was relatively cheap for camera’s at the time, it was still an expensive purchase. What truly separated Kodak from other photography companies was the manufacture of the Pocket Kodak in 1895. It was sold on the market for $5.00, a very affordable price. The Eastman Kodak Company revolutionized the world of photography again in 1900 with its new Brownie Model Series. It was sold for $1.00, making it the most affordable camera on the market.
 As the Eastman Kodak Company and its camera’s became popular on the consumer market, “Kodaking” became a common term to describe photography using a Kodak camera. The household was where George Eastman wanted to focus his marketing. He believed that women and children were the key to immersing his hand-held cameras into everyday life. Women were usually the ones who recorded the everyday life of the family, and their children were the main subjects. Eastman also believed in the education of children and that “the progress of the world depends entirely on education.” He was a very charitable man and donated money to institutions such as Massachusetts Institue of Technology where he had hired many graduates to work on evolving his camera technology.
Manufacturer: Eastman Kodak Company