Image use must be for education or personal purposes only.
The contributing institution must be credited.
DesBrisay Museum

Agitator


Accession number: 82.13X.120.2 C-D
Object type: Butter
Date: circa 1900
Materials: Wood
Measurements: 74 cm L x 18 cm W
Marks/Label: Small paper label attached with two small nails reads:  David M. Moland Chester Lunenburg Co., N.S.
Subject: Lunenburg County, Chester, People, David M. Moland
Narrative: A butter churn is a device used to convert cream into butter.  This is done through a mechanical process.  Frequently via a pole inserted through the lid of a wood churn known as an adjitator, or via a crank used to turn a rotating device inside the churn. 

The most historically prominent types of butter churns are the plunge churn, which is a container, usually made out of wood, where the butter-making action is created by moving in a vertical motion a staff that is inserted into the top. This type of churn is also known as an ‘up and down’ churn, churning tub, or plunger churn.
Description: (d) Long round wood pole known as the staff which is inserted vertically into two pieces of shaped wood which cross at centre to form a stand.  (c)  Two round pieces of wood to form the top of the churn which are attached to each other.  Top piece is larger than bottom and is formed to create a slope in the middle for collecting the cream.  Small paper label attached with two small nails reads:  David M. Moland Chester Lunenburg Co., N.S.    Churn is missing.
History of Use: Part of a butter churn used for churning cream to form butter.