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DesBrisay Museum

Agitator


Accession number: 82.13X.120.1 A-B
Object type: Butter
Date: circa 1900
Materials: TURNED WOOD
Measurements: 59 cm L x 16.1 cm W
Marks/Label: WRITTEN IN PENCIL ON BOTTOM OF BOWL: DAVID MOLAND CHESTER  N.S.
Subject: LUNENBURG COUNTY, CHESTER, PEOPLE, DAVID M. MOLAND
Narrative: A butter churn is a device used to convert cream into butter.  This is done through a mechanical process.  Frequently via a pole inserted through the lid of a wood churn known as an adjitator, or via a crank used to turn a rotating device inside the churn. 

The most historically prominent types of butter churns are the plunge churn, which is a container, usually made out of wood, where the butter-making action is created by moving in a vertical motion a staff that is inserted into the top. This type of churn is also known as an ‘up and down’ churn, churning tub, or plunger churn.
Description: (A) BUTTER AGITATOR WITH BOTTOM SHAPED LIKE A CROSS WITH FOUR HOLES, ONE  IN THE END OF EACH CROSS BAR.  POLE (OR STAFF)  HANDLE SITS VERTICALLY IN CENTER OF CROSS BASE. (B) COVER WITH TOP SHAPED LIKE A BOWL FOR CREAM. HOLE GOES THROUGH CENTER OF BOWL.  WRITTEN IN PENCIL ON BOTTOM OF BOWL: DAVID MOLAND CHESTER  N.S.  BARREL IS MISSING.
History of Use: PART OF A BUTTER CHURN.