Horn, Powder
Horn, Powder
Horn, Powder
Horn, Powder
Horn, Powder
Horn, Powder
Horn, Powder
Horn, Powder
Horn, Powder
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Annapolis Heritage Society

Horn, Powder


Accession number: 010.1.1
Date: 1759
Materials: Ox horn, wood
Measurements: 37 cm LCircumference = 26 cm at widest point and 6 cm at opening end.
Signature: NH(incised on bottom of plug)
Marks/Label:

Extensive scrimshaw letter and nautical imagery. There are geometric decorations and nautical motifs worked in scrimshaw amongst the lettering and running along the base of the horn. One area appears to depcit a whaling scene: six men in a dory type boat harpooning a large fish (looks much more like a halibut than a whale).

Starting from the inner curve of the horn we interpret the lettering to read as:

June the 6th 1759

Annaplois Royal (Fundy)

Nathaniel Horton   his horn

Sept Y Eunice Horton Snow(?)

Description: Large ox horn curved about quarter curl with a shiny surface with color ranging from golden brown/greenish brown/tobacco brown. Wooden plug fitted at wide end; segment of horn, approximately 2cmx5cm, extends beyond plug with two .5cm holes drilled 1.5 cm apart. 4cm from pointed end there is a collar that protrudes approximately .5 cm. Opening at tip is approximately 1 cm in diameter.
Extensive scrimshaw decorations overall as under marks.
History of Use: Powder horns were a container for holding gun powder that accompanied muskets and other early firearms. They also served as an artistic medium as the horns became uniquely decorated by the men who made and used them. This horn was made by Nathaniel Horton (Nathanel Horton) in Annapolis Royal (Anaplus Rial) in 1759. Genealogical records indicate that Horton was born in Eastham, MA on 24 February, 1721, and married Eunice Snow who was born 30 November, 1722. They were married on 10 April, 1742. They had eleven children. Horton's date of death is listed as 31 December 1763.
The incomplete information we have at this time (March 2010) that there were some Nova Scotia family connections- possibly MaKay. What brought Horton to Annapolis Royal in 1759 also remains a mystery at present.